How Divorce Jurisdiction Can Be Determined by Your Shoes

Sounds crazy but it happened. The couple lived a bicontinental jet set life. The wife tried to commence the divorce in New York County because, unlike Manhattan, Monaco does not have a concept of shared marital property. The husband contested that the New York jurisdiction was the couple’s primary residence. One of the arguments made was that the wife kept the majority of her valuable shoe collection in Monaco. Read an article here. The New York Court denied jurisdiction, See, First Department Case here.

How do normal people determine jurisdiction for a divorce proceeding?

According to Domestic Relations Law Sec 230, an action to annul a marriage, or to declare the nullity of a void marriage, or for divorce or separation may be maintained only when:

  1. The parties were married in the state and either party is a resident thereof when the action is commenced and has been a resident for a continuous period of one year immediately preceding, or
  2. The parties have resided in this state as husband and wife and either party is a resident thereof when the action is commenced and has been a resident for a continuous period of one year immediately preceding, or
  3. The cause occurred in the state and either party has been a resident thereof for a continuous period of at least one year immediately preceding the commencement of the action, or
  4. The cause occurred in the state and both parties are residents thereof at the time of the commencement of the action, or
  5. Either party has been a resident of the state for a continuous period of at least two years immediately preceding the commencement of the action.

If you want New York to be your jurisdiction make sure you have proof that you have been living here for the requisite period of time. Start by moving your shoe collection.

If you would like to determine whether New York is the proper jurisdiction for your divorce, contact Diana Mohyi Attorney at Law for guidance.

The Difference between a Contested and Uncontested Divorce

What is the difference between a Contested and Uncontested Divorce in New York? One is cheaper and quicker to accomplish if done correctly. The other can be an arduous painful process lasting years and leaving the wary and unreasonable possibly bankrupt.

An Uncontested Divorce is one where both parties voluntarily sign an agreement which resolves all aspects of the divorce. Every single thing is agreed upon from child custody and child support to maintenance and equitable distribution. Even disagreement on one single issue makes the divorce contested. The parties cannot waive child support and if the calculation of child support is incorrect or unfair, then the court will reject the filing. The time from filing to signing varies between counties. New York County has signed an uncontested divorce order within 3-4 months while the Bronx and Brooklyn has signed it within 6 months. The time periods vary depending on how many people are ahead of you. One mistake can result in a rejected filing which extends the time process.

In a Contested Divorce at least one or more issues is not agreed upon by the parties. A Contested Divorce requires the filing of a complaint for divorce by one party–the Plaintiff—who then serves it on the other party–The Defendant. The Defendant must then either file and serve an Answer to the Complaint or may file a motion to dismiss because they contest jurisdiction. They may, for example, perfer to have the divorce occur in a different jurisdiction that is more favorable to them. Practically speaking it does not matter whether someone is a Plaintiff or Defendant because most divorces are typically filed as no fault, otherwise known as ‘irreconcilable differences’ or ‘‘irretrievable breakdown.’

If you need assistance in filing a Contested or Uncontested Divorce, Diana Mohyi Attorney at Law can assist you to navigate the minefield of Matrimonial Law Practice. Contact her for a consultation.