Why Can’t You Get a Divorce in New York Family Court?

It seems obvious that family court should handle all things family but in New York Courts that is not true. According to the New York Family Court Act Section 115, the Family Court has exclusive original Jurisdiction or control, over the following:

    • child abuse and neglect proceedings
    • child support proceedings
    • proceedings to determine paternity and for the support of children born out-of-wedlock
    • proceedings to permanently terminate parental rights to guardianship and custody of a child
    • proceedings concerning whether a person is in need of supervision
    • proceedings concerning juvenile delinquency
    • proceedings involving handicapped children
    •  proceedings concerning adoption and custody of children
    • proceedings concerning the uniform interstate family support act
    • proceedings concerning children in foster care and care and custody of children
    •  proceedings concerning former foster children 
    • proceedings concerning destitute children
    •  proceedings concerning guardianship and custody of children by reason of the death of, or abandonment or surrender by, the parent or parents
    •  proceedings concerning standby guardianship and guardianship of the person
    • proceedings concerning the interstate compact on juveniles
    • the interstate compact on the placement of children
    • the uniform child custody jurisdiction and enforcement act
    •  provided that tribal courts of Indian tribes designated as such by the state of New York shall have jurisdiction over such child custody proceedings involving Indian children to the same extent as federally designated Indian tribes upon the approval of the state office of children and family services 
    • concurrent jurisdiction with the criminal court over all family offenses
    • jurisdiction to direct the commencement of proceedings to suspend the driving privileges, recreational licenses and permits, and license, permit, registration or authority to practice of persons who are delinquent in their child or combined child and spousal support obligations or persons who have failed, after receiving appropriate notice, to comply with summonses, subpoenas or warrants relating to paternity and child support proceedings

In order to obtain a divorce, one must file an action in the New York Supreme Courts. The Family Court only has jurisdiction in matrimonial action only when the case is referred to it by the Supreme Court. If you are seeking a divorce you must file a complaint for divorce in the Supreme Court of the County where the parties were married and either party resided for at least one year prior to the filing pursuant to Domestic Relations Law 230.

If you are confused about where to obtain your divorce and need assistance in filing or defending a divorce action, Diana Mohyi Attorney at Law P.C. can represent you. Contact Attorney Diana Mohyi for a consultation.